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The Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, News agency, or Broadcasting Organisation visa scheme allows for the employees of media organisations to be posted to the UK on long-term assignments. It’s a convenient visa route for journalists and broadcasters, and can lead to permanent settlement in the UK after 5 years spent in the country.

WH Solicitors offers expert advice that simplifies the application process. We will help you to understand if this visa scheme is suitable for you, and provide a complete package of support to ensure your visa application is as strong as possible.

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Who Can Apply for a Visa in This Category?

This visa category allows the representatives of overseas newspapers, media organisations, and broadcasters to come to the UK as part of a long-term posting. While many visa applicants are journalists, this visa category is also available to producers, camera operators and people occupying other skilled media roles. Secretaries, administrators and other support staff will not usually qualify for a visa in this category.

Requirements for a Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, News Agency, or Broadcasting Organisation Visa

To qualify for a visa as an employee of an overseas news agency, newspaper, or broadcasting organisation, you will need to satisfy the following criteria:

  • You are an employee of an overseas newspaper, media agency, or broadcasting organisation
  • You were recruited overseas, outside of the UK
  • You have been posted to the UK on a long-term assignment
  • You intend to work full time for your listed employer only
  • You have sufficient knowledge of the English language
  • Your employer’s primary place of business is outside of the UK
  • You have sufficient funds to maintain yourself and any dependants whilst you are in the country without relying on public funds

The English Language Requirement

To qualify for a visa as a representative of an overseas newspaper, media organisation or broadcaster you will need to show that you have sufficient knowledge of the English language. This means you must demonstrate that you understand the language to at least CEFR level A1 or above and can understand and hold a basic conversation with others.

The requirement can be met either by passing an approved English language test in speaking and listening or by showing that you have an academic qualification that is recognised by Ecctis (formerly UK NARIC) as equivalent to a UK bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or a PhD.

Representative of an Overseas Newspaper or Media Organisation Visa Conditions

Once a Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, Media Agency, or Broadcaster Visa has been granted, you will be permitted to:

  • Work full-time for your employer
  • Bring eligible family members with you to the UK as dependants
  • Apply to extend your visa
  • Apply for settled status after 5 years in the country

You cannot:

  • Be self-employed, work for yourself, or for any other organisation except the business named in your visa application
  • Stay in the UK if your media role arrangement ends
  • Access public funds or apply for most benefits

How We Can Help?

The Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, Media Organisation or Broadcaster visa provides journalists and other skilled media staff with a way to come to the UK. It is a convenient scheme for both media employees and their employers, but it can be difficult to show that you meet the relevant eligibility criteria and get approved.

WH Solicitors’ highly experienced team of immigration lawyers can provide all the advice and support necessary to ensure your application is as strong as possible. We offer much-needed guidance and clarity for clients as they try to navigate the UK’s complex visa system.

For more information, help, and support, contact our team today by calling (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

Contact the Team

Representative of an Overseas Newspaper or Media Organisation Visa – FAQs

How long is a Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, News Agency, or Broadcasting Organisation visa valid for?

A Representative of an Overseas Newspaper visa will usually be issued for an initial period of three years. As mentioned below, this period may be extendable by a further period of two years.

Can you extend a Representative of an Overseas Media Organisation visa?

Yes – you may be able to extend your visa for an additional 2 years after you have completed an initial 3 years in the UK. To extend your visa, you will need to show that you are still working for the overseas newspaper or media organisation listed in your initial application.

H3: Can an Overseas Media Agency post more than one representative to the UK?

Yes, an overseas media company can post more than one representative to the UK. This means that multiple Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, Media Organisation or Broadcaster visas can be issued to the staff of a single foreign organisation.

Can you settle in the UK with an Overseas Newspaper, News Agency or Broadcasting Agency visa?

Yes – you may be eligible to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR, or Settled Status) as an employee of an overseas news or media organisation after you have spent 5 years in the UK. To qualify, you will need to show that you continue to represent your employer in the UK demonstrate that they maintain a primary place of business overseas. You will not usually be eligible to apply if you have spent more than 180 days outside of the UK in any 12 month period.

Can you bring your family to the UK with a Representative of an Overseas Newspaper or Media Organisation visa?

Yes – your family members may qualify to come to the UK with you as dependants. This may include your husband, wife, partner, and children under the age of 18. Your spouse or partner cannot come to the UK as your dependant if they own or control a majority of the overseas media organisation or newspaper that you are a representative of.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

The Representative of an Overseas Newspaper, News agency, or Broadcasting Organisation visa scheme allows for the employees of media organisations to be posted to the UK on long-term assignments. It’s a convenient visa route for journalists and

The UK’s Sole Representative visa scheme makes it possible to come to the UK to establish a branch or subsidiary business for your overseas employer. It offers a way for foreign businesses to kickstart their investment and presence in the UK, but it’s not always easy to show that you satisfy all the necessary requirements for visa clearance.

WH Solicitors provides expert advice to individuals and businesses alike. We will provide you with a complete understanding of your options, making sure that you have all the information and support needed to make a successful visa application.

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What is a Sole Representative?

A Sole Representative is an individual who comes to the UK on behalf of their overseas employer with the aim of establishing a registered UK branch or wholly-owned subsidiary.

To qualify for a visa in this category, the individual’s employer must have their headquarters outside of the United Kingdom and must have no other branch, subsidiary, or representative active in the UK.  The visa applicants must hold a senior position within their employer’s business and be able to make decisions on their behalf whilst in the UK.

In most cases, you will also need to satisfy the following criteria:

  • Have been an employee of the parent company in a senior role
  • Have an established record for business development and/or setting up branches in foreign countries
  • Have the necessary authority to take operational decisions for their employer whilst in the UK

You cannot come to the UK as a Sole Representative of an Overseas Business if you are a majority shareholder of that business (owning 50% or more of its shares).

Requirements for a UK Sole Representative Visa

To qualify as a Sole Representative of an Overseas Business, you will need to:

  • Have been recruited and be employed outside of the UK by the employer you are applying to represent
  • Intend to work full-time for that organisation whilst in the UK, and not to take any other form of employment
  • Have enough money to support yourself and any dependants who join you in the UK without needing to access public funds
  • Meet the English language requirement (unless you are a national of an exempt country)

Company Requirements

There are also requirements in relation to the parent company you will represent whilst in the UK. To support your visa application, they must:

  • Be a genuine commercial enterprise
  • Maintain a principal place of business outside the UK
  • Have a genuine intention to set up a UK branch or wholly-owned subsidiary

When reviewing an application for a Sole Representative of an Overseas Business visa, Entry Clearance Officers may also consider the turnover, business type, and nature of the organisation that is supporting the candidate’s application.

The English Language Requirement

You may need to prove your knowledge of the English language to be eligible for a Sole Representative of an Overseas Business visa.

To comply with this requirement, you could take an approved English language test in speaking and listening at CEFR level A1 or above. This level of English typically means that you can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and interact with other people in a basic way. Alternatively, you could satisfy the English language requirement by showing that you have an academic qualification that is recognised by Ecctis (formerly UK NARIC) as equivalent to a UK bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or a PhD.

Sole Representative Visa Conditions

Once a Sole Representative Visa has been granted, you will be permitted to:

  • Work full-time for your employer
  • Bring eligible family members with you to the UK as dependants
  • Apply to extend your visa
  • Apply for settled status after 5 years in the country

You cannot:

  • Be self-employed, work for yourself, or for any other organisation except the business named in your visa application
  • Stay in the UK if your sole representative arrangement ends
  • Switch to this visa from another category
  • Access public funds or apply for most benefits

How We Can Help?

The Sole Representative of an Overseas Business scheme offers a convenient way for talented individuals to come to the UK to extend their career. It also provides businesses with a means to set up a presence in the country while offering a potential route to settlement to the visa holder and their family.

WH Solicitors’ expert team of immigration lawyers have an in-depth understanding of the requirements and how they are assessed by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI).  We will provide you with a fast and effective service that secures the best possible result for you, your family, and your employer.

For more information, help, and support, contact our team today by calling (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

Contact the Team

Sole Representative Visa – FAQs

How long is a Sole Representative visa valid for?

A Sole Representative visa will usually be issued for an initial period of three years.

Can you extend a Sole Representative visa?

You may qualify to extend your visa for a further two years once the initial three-year clearance period has elapsed. To successfully extend your visa, you will need to still be working as the sole UK representative of your overseas employer – having established a branch or wholly-owned subsidiary, or be working towards doing so.

Can you switch to a Sole Representative visa?

No, it is not possible to switch to a Sole Representative visa from another category whilst already in the UK. Applications for visas in this category must be made from outside of the country.

Can you settle in the UK with a Sole Representative visa?

You may be eligible to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) as a sole representative of an overseas business after having spent 5 years in the UK. To qualify, you will need to show that you have established a registered branch or wholly-owned subsidiary of your overseas employer’s business in the UK, and should have spent no more than 180 days outside of the country during any 12 months.

Can you bring your family to the UK with a Sole Representative visa?

Yes – your family members can come with you to the UK as dependants if you have a Sole Representative of an Overseas business. This includes your husband, wife, or partner, along with children under the age of 18. Your spouse or partner cannot come to the UK as a dependant if they own or control a majority of the overseas business you will be representing.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

The UK’s Sole Representative visa scheme makes it possible to come to the UK to establish a branch or subsidiary business for your overseas employer. It offers a way for foreign businesses to kickstart their investment and

If you work for a foreign organisation with plans to set up a new branch, or are an employee of a news media company, you may be eligible to apply to come to the UK as a representative of an overseas business.

WH Solicitors are expert immigration lawyers that regularly assist the representatives of overseas businesses with UK visa applications. We provide a complete service that allows our clients to make an informed decision about their immigration status, and provides them with the best chance of getting approved for a UK visa.

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Who Can Apply For A Representative of an Overseas Business Visa?

You can apply for a visa as a representative of an overseas business if you are either:

  • the sole UK representative of an overseas business that plans to set up a UK branch or wholly-owned subsidiary
  • an employee of a foreign newspaper, news agency, or broadcasting organisation that has been posted to the UK on a long-term assignment

If your visa application is approved, you will usually be able to stay in the UK for a period of three years with the option to extend that for another two years. Representatives of an Overseas Business may qualify for Indefinite Leave to Remain after spending five years in the UK.

What are the Eligibility Requirements?

The eligibility criteria for a Representative of an Overseas Business visa vary depending on whether you are applying as a sole representative of a foreign organisation, or as an employee of an overseas newspaper, news agency, or broadcaster.

Applicants who intend to come to the UK as their employer’s sole representative will need to:

  • Have been recruited outside the UK by a business that is actively trading
  • Have the skills, knowledge, and experience required to perform the role
  • Hold a senior position and have the authority to make decisions on behalf of the business
  • Not own or control the majority of the business
  • Plan to establish the business’s first UK commercial presence as a registered branch or wholly-owned subsidiary

To come to the UK as an employee of an overseas newspaper, news agency, or broadcasting organisation, you will need to show that you will represent your employer in the UK through a long-term, full-time role. You will also usually need to provide a full description of your employer’s activities, including details of their accounts and assets.

English Language Requirement

You may be required to prove your knowledge of the English language to qualify for a Representative of an Overseas Business visa. This could involve taking an approved English language test in speaking and listening at CEFR level A1 or above. This is commonly referred to as ‘beginner’ English and involves (amongst other things) showing that you can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and basic phrases, introduce yourself and others, and interact with other people in a simple way.

As an alternative, you may be able to satisfy the English language requirement by having an academic qualification that Ecctis (previously UK NARIC) recognises as equivalent to a UK bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or a PhD.

You will not need to prove your knowledge of the English language if you are a national from any of the following countries:

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • the Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • USA

Representative of an Overseas Business Visa Conditions

Once a visa has been granted, migrants are permitted to:

  • Work in the UK full time for their employer
  • Bring an eligible partner, spouse, or children to the UK as dependants
  • Apply to extend their visa
  • Apply to settle in the UK after spending 5 years in the country

Visa holders in this category are not permitted to:

  • Be self-employed or work for themselves
  • Work for any business other than the employer stated in their application
  • Access public funds or apply for most benefits
  • Stay in the UK after the end of the sole representative arrangement

Extending a Representative of an Overseas Business Visa

A Representative of an Overseas Business visa will usually be granted for an initial term of three years. Towards the end of this period, you may qualify to apply for a further two-year extension.

To qualify for a visa extension, you will need to be able to show that:

  • You’re still working for the same employer as their representative in the UK
  • You have established, and are supervising, a UK subsidiary or branch of their overseas business
  • Your employer’s main place of business is still outside the UK

How We Can Help?

The Representative of an Overseas Business Visa provides overseas professionals with a convenient route to living, working and settling in the UK.

WH Solicitors’ highly experienced immigration lawyers can provide the help, advice, and support you need to secure visa clearance. Our practice is recognised by The Law Society, meaning we are permitted to assist with your application to make the process as smooth as possible.

For more information, help, and support, contact our team today by calling (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

Contact the Team

Representative of an Overseas Business Visa – FAQs

How long is a Representative of an Overseas Business visa valid for?

A Representative of an Overseas Business visa lasts for an initial period of three years. You may then be able to extend your stay for a further two years. You could be eligible to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK (settled status) after spending five years in the country as the representative of an overseas business.

Can you switch to a Representative of an Overseas Business visa?

No – you cannot usually switch to a Representative of an Overseas Business visa. If you are considering switching visa categories whether from inside or outside of the UK, contact our team to gain a better understanding of your options.

Can I replace a previous Representative of an Overseas Business?

Yes, provided you meet the other eligibility criteria, you may be able to replace another representative of an overseas business if your employer has already started working to establish a UK branch or subsidiary.

Can you bring your family to the UK with a Representative of an Overseas Business visa?

Yes, representatives of an Overseas Business visa holders can bring their partner, spouse and/or children to the UK as dependants. They will typically need to prove their relationship with the Representative of an Overseas Business visa holder, and adults must provide an overseas criminal record certificate for any country they have lived in for at least 12 months during the last 10 years – along with Tuberculosis testing certificates if they are coming from one of the countries listed on the following page of the government website.

Your spouse or partner cannot come to the UK as a dependant if they own or control a majority of the overseas business you will be representing.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

If you work for a foreign organisation with plans to set up a new branch, or are an employee of a news media company, you may be eligible to apply to come to the UK as a

Commonwealth Flag

The UK Ancestry visa scheme is designed to provide Commonwealth citizens who are the close descendants of UK nationals to live and work in the UK. Many individuals living in New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, India, and other Commonwealth countries have close ties to Britain and may even qualify for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) after spending 5 years in the UK with an Ancestry visa.

WH Solicitors are highly experienced immigration lawyers with a strong track record for supporting Commonwealth citizens as they progress through the UK visa application process. We can help you to understand and meet all the requirements to give you the best chance of getting approved for a UK Ancestry visa.

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What is a UK Ancestry Visa?

The UK Ancestry visa scheme provides a route for commonwealth citizens with British family heritage to come to the UK. Visas in this category last for an initial period of 5 years, with the option to extend your stay or even apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain (or ‘settlement’) after that time.

This is a flexible immigration route since migrants are not restricted in terms of the jobs they can do whilst in the UK, and could even permit their family to join them in the country as dependants.

Requirements for a UK Ancestry Visa

To qualify for a UK Ancestry visa, you will need to meet the following criteria:

  • You must be a Commonwealth citizen;
  • Are aged 17 or over;
  • You plan to work in the UK; and
  • You have enough money to support yourself and any dependants you intend to bring with you during your time in the country.

It is also necessary to show that at least one of your grandparents was born in the UK (including on the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands). You may also apply if they were born before 31 March 1922 in what is the present-day Republic of Ireland, or if they were born on a British-registered ship or aircraft carrier. You will usually need to provide the full birth certificate of the parent or grandparent you are relying on to establish ancestry.

It is still possible to claim ancestry if you or your parent were adopted, or if your parents or grandparents were not married. You cannot claim UK ancestry through a relationship with the stepparents of their relatives.

Applicants must also pay the immigration health surcharge, provide tuberculosis test results if they are coming from a listed country, and show a criminal record certificate from any country they have lived in for at least 12 months during the past 10 years.

Visa Conditions

Once a UK Ancestry visa has been granted, migrants are permitted to:

  • work in the UK
  • be self-employed or act as a director of a business
  • study at an educational institution
  • bring an eligible partner and/or children to the country as dependants; and
  • travel abroad and return to the UK.

You are not permitted to:

  • access public funds or apply for most benefits; or
  • switch to this visa category if you came to the UK on another visa.

Indefinite Leave to Remain with a UK Ancestry Visa

You may be eligible to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain after spending 5 years in the UK with a UK Ancestry visa. A successful application will leave you with settled status – allowing you to live, work, and study in the UK with no limit on your stay. You will also be able to apply for benefits if you are eligible, and could even use your settled status to apply for British Citizenship.

For an application to be successful, you must have spent no longer than 180 days outside of the UK during any 12-month period of your time in the country. You will usually need to show that you have sufficient knowledge of the English language, and must pass the Life in the UK test.

How We Can Help?

The UK Ancestry visa scheme allows people with close family ties to the UK to come to the country to work and live. It’s aimed at Commonwealth citizens with British heritage, but it can be difficult to satisfy the eligibility criteria and to prove that your grandparents were born in the UK.

WH Solicitors’ expert immigration lawyers have a comprehensive understanding of the UK Ancestry visa scheme and can provide clear advice that will give you the best chance of getting approved.

For more information, help, and support, contact our team today by calling (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

Contact the Team

UK Ancestry Visa – FAQs

How long is a UK Ancestry visa valid for?

A UK Ancestry visa allows you to stay in the UK for an initial period of 5 years. After this time, you may then be able to apply to extend your visa for a further 5-year period, or to apply for permanent settlement in the UK (known as Indefinite Leave to Remain).

Can you switch to a UK Ancestry visa?

You cannot switch to an Ancestry visa if you are already in the UK under another category of visa. Applications can still be made from outside of the country in certain circumstances, and our team can provide guidance and support to any migrants who wish to understand whether they qualify for a UK Ancestry visa.

Which countries are part of the Commonwealth?

To qualify for a UK Ancestry visa you must be a citizen of a Commonwealth country as listed under in Schedule 3 of the British Natonality Act 1981. Individuals from the following countries may therefore be eligible to apply:

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • The Bahamas
  • Bangladesh
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Botswana
  • Brunei Darussalam
  • Cameroon
  • Canada
  • Cyprus
  • Dominica
  • Fiji Islands
  • The Gambia
  • Ghana
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • India
  • Jamaica
  • Kenya
  • Kiribati
  • Lesotho
  • Malawi
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Malta
  • Mauritius
  • Mozambique
  • Namibia
  • Nauru
  • New Zealand
  • Nigeria
  • Pakistan
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Samoa
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Singapore
  • Solomon Islands
  • South Africa
  • Sri Lanka
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Swaziland
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Tuvalu
  • Uganda
  • United Republic of Tanzania
  • Vanuatu
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

Can you renew a UK Ancestry visa?

Yes – you may be able to apply for a further 5-year extension of a UK Ancestry visa once your initial term has ended. You may also qualify for Indefinite Leave to Remain, subject to meeting certain criteria such as having spent no longer than 180 days outside of the UK during any 12-month period of your stay in the country.

Can you bring your family to the UK with a UK Ancestry visa?

Yes, you are permitted to bring certain family members to the UK as dependants if you have an Ancestry visa. This could include your spouse, civil partner, unmarried partner, and any children under the age of 18. You will need to show that you have sufficient funds to support and accommodate them during your time in the country.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

 

 

The UK Ancestry visa scheme is designed to provide Commonwealth citizens who are the close descendants of UK nationals to live and work in the UK. Many individuals living in New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, India, and

The UK’s Minister of Religion (T2) Visa scheme allows migrants to come to the UK for work within faith communities. Eligible jobs that fall within the scope of this visa scheme include ministers of religion, missionaries, and members of religious orders.

Successful applicants can stay in the UK for up to 3 years and 1 month, although they may be able to apply to extend their stay. The Minister of Religion visa allows you to bring your partner and/or children to the UK if they are eligible.

As specialist immigration solicitors, we help our clients to secure visas across all categories – including for work and volunteering within religious communities. We use our expertise to navigate the UK’s complex visa system, and assist all clients with the fast, reliable, and sensitive service that they deserve.

Minister of Religion Visa Eligibility Requirements

To qualify for a Minister of Religion (T2) visa, applicants must:

  • gain a Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS) from a religious organisation that has a Sponsorship Licence from the UK Home Office;
  • prove sufficient knowledge of the English language;
  • show that you are being paid an appropriate salary;
  • have enough in savings to support yourself when you arrive in the country;
  • prove you can travel, and show travel history for the past 5 years;
  • provide tuberculosis test results if you are migrating from a country listed in the Immigration Rules.

Your Certificate of Sponsorship must confirm that your stay will be subject to pay and conditions that are equal to, or in excess of, those that would ordinarily be given to a settled worker in the same role. This could take the form of a salary, stipend, customary offering, board and lodgings, or a combination of these features. Your salary must at the very least comply with, or be exempt from, the UK’s National Minimum Wage regulations.

Applicants must also pay the UK’s Healthcare Surcharge in advance, although this will be refunded if their application is refused.

The Points-Based Criteria

The Minister of Religion visa uses the UK’s points-based immigration system to apply the above eligibility criteria. For a successful application, applicants to this visa category must score 70 points from the following criteria:

  • up to 50 points for gaining a valid Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS);
  • up to 10 points for having the necessary funds to maintain themselves on arrival in the UK;
  • up to 10 points for knowledge and proficiency with the English language.

Gaining Sponsorship

For a Minister of Religion (T2) visa application to be approved, the Home Office UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) must be satisfied that the candidate’s proposed job is genuine and one that they are capable of undertaking. To assess this, they will apply the Genuineness Test and may request additional information or even require the applicant to attend an interview.

When assessing genuineness, UKVI will consider the applicant’s knowledge of the role, their relevant experience, knowledge of the UK sponsor organisation, the method and circumstances of recruitment, and any other relevant information.

Visa Conditions

Successful applicants who gain a Minister of Religion visa are permitted to work for their sponsor in the job described on their Certificate of Sponsorship. They can also:

  • take on a second role of up to 20 hours per week in certain circumstances, if it is in the same profession as their main job or is on the Skilled Worker Shortage Occupation list;
  • do voluntary work;
  • study, provided that it does not interfere with the sponsored role;
  • travel abroad and return to the UK; and
  • bring an eligible partner and/or children into the UK.

Minister of Religion visa holders are not permitted to:

  • access public funds; or
  • own more than 10% of their sponsor’s shares, unless they earn more than £159,600 per year.

How We Can Help

At WH Solicitors, we are experts in our field and provide all clients with a fast, reliable, high-quality service that secures visa application success.

Our experienced team can help you to assess the best visa categories for your circumstances, assist your proposed employer in getting a Home Office sponsorship licence, and represent your interests in coming to the UK and even bringing your family with you.

For more information, help, and support, contact our team today by calling (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

Minister of Religion (T2) Visa – FAQs

Who Has the Right to Work in the UK?

All individuals must prove their right to work in the UK before employment can commence, however, the following individuals do not need any further leave or permission from the Home Office to do so:

  • British Citizens (but not British Overseas Citizens, British National (Overseas) or British Protected Persons)
  • EU/EEA/Swiss nationals resident in the UK by or before 31 December 2020, and who subsequently apply to EU Settlement Scheme for pre-settled or settled status by 30 June 2021
  • Non-British nationals with Leave to Remain/Settlement in the UK

The following groups are also exempt from UK work visa requirements:

  • Members of the armed forces of Commonwealth or Overseas Territories posted to the UK
  • Overseas government ministers while on official business
  • Officials working for an overseas head of state
  • Diplomats who resided outside of the UK when appointed to their post

All other individuals require a visa to work in the UK, and should not commence employment until the relevant proof of visa status has been given.

How does the UK immigration points system work?

From 1 January 2021, the UK launched a new points-based immigration system. The points-based system works by assigning points that reflect various factors, such as a migrant’s professional skills and grasp of the English language.

Under the new system, applicants who wish to come to the UK to work will need to score a minimum of 70 points to qualify for a visa. The points requirements that apply to Minister of Religion (T2) visa applications vary from the general table that is set out below.

Some requirements are mandatory and will earn a visa applicant a maximum of 50 points. The remaining 20 points can be made up of Under the new system, applicants who wish to come to the UK to work will need to score a minimum of 70 points to qualify for a visa.

The current criteria for the points-based system are as follows:

CharacteristicsMandatory / TradeablePoints
Offer of a job by an approved sponsorMandatory20
Job at an appropriate skill levelMandatory20
Speaks English at the required levelMandatory10
Salary of £20,480 to £23,039 or at least 80% of the going rate for the profession (whichever is higher)Tradeable0
Salary of £23,040 to £25,599 or at least 90% of the going rate for the profession (whichever is higher)Tradeable10
Salary of £25,600 or above or at least the going rate for the profession (whichever is higher)Tradeable20
Job in a shortage occupation as designated by the Migration Advisory CommitteeTradeable20
Education qualification: PhD in a subject relevant to the jobTradeable10
Education qualification: PhD in a STEM subject relevant to the jobTradeable20

What are the rules for EU nationals already in the UK?

Following the end of the UK’s Brexit transition period and the freedom of movement with the EU, the rules for EU nationals have changed.

EU Nationals already resident in the UK as at 11 pm on 31 December 2020 have until 30 June 2021 to submit an application to the EU Settlement Scheme for pre-settled or settled status. Individuals who fall into this category have the right to work in the UK until 30 June 2021 regardless of whether they have made an application to the scheme or not.

EU Nationals who arrived in the UK after 31 December 2020 have no right to work unless, before arrival, they have obtained a visa that permits them to do so. These individuals are not eligible for the EU Settlement Scheme.

Employers will not be required to conduct retrospective checks on existing EU national employees after 30 June 2021. After this time, the same new immigration rules will apply to both EU and non-EU nationals, and so employers who wish to recruit workers from abroad will need to hold a sponsor licence.

Can you bring your family to the UK on a Minister of Religion visa?

Yes – provided they are eligible, you can bring your partner and/or children to the UK as dependants with a Minister of Religion visa.

Can you apply for indefinite leave to remain with a Minister of Religion visa?

Yes – to qualify for settlement via Indefinite Leave to Remain with a Minister of Religion visa, you must have continuously resided in the UK under the same visa route for a period of at least 5 years.

Contact our team for help and support with applying for settlement in the UK.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

The UK’s Minister of Religion (T2) Visa scheme allows migrants to come to the UK for work within faith communities. Eligible jobs that fall within the scope of this visa scheme include ministers of religion, missionaries, and

Points-Based Immigration System: What It Means For UK Employers And Migrants

From 1st January 2021, the UK will be subject to a new points-based immigration system. Marking the effective end of free movement with the EU. The new system includes several changes that will affect both migrants and, in the case of certain classes of visa, the employers that sponsor them to come to the UK.

As time marches on, our position remains that UK employers that wish to hire from abroad, particularly staff from the EU, should apply for a Tier 2 Sponsor Licence as soon as possible.

In this article, we explain the changes made by the new points-based immigration system and what they mean for those affected.

What is the UK points-based immigration system?

The launch date of the new points-based system is no coincidence, as it falls after the end of the UK’s Brexit transition period with the EU. As the new rules come into effect, EU migrants will be treated in the same way as those from the rest of the world.

The points-based system will work by assigning points that reflect various factors, such as a migrant’s professional skills and their grasp of the English language. To be eligible for a visa, an applicant will need to qualify for at least 70 points.

The new system will not apply to EU citizens already living in the UK by 31st December 2020. Those who fall under this bracket (as well as their family members) must apply under the EU Settlement Scheme and have until 30th June 2021 to do so.

In the meantime, UK employers may continue to accept the passports and national identity cards of EU citizens as evidence of their right to work in the country. Similarly, the system will not affect international students who wish to study in the UK. With a new graduate visa set to be launched during summer 2021, it is expected that students who have completed a degree will be permitted to stay for a further two years, or three if they’ve attained a PhD.

What are the requirements to work in the UK from January 2021?

Under the new system, applicants who wish to come to the UK to work will need to score a minimum of 70 points to qualify for a visa.

On a basic level, applicants will be required to show that:

  • they speak English
  • they have a job offer from a sponsor approved by the Home Office
  • the job offer is at the necessary skill level (Regulated Qualifications Framework level 3 or above – equating to A Level or equivalent)

The job offered to the applicant must also meet the minimum salary threshold, which is the higher figure of either:

  • the general salary threshold set by the Government at £25,600; or
  • the specific salary requirement for the individual occupation – known as the “going rate”.

By meeting these criteria, applicants will earn a maximum of 50 points. The remaining 20 points can be made up from so-called “tradeable” characteristics, usually based on the salary for the role offered to the applicant, or their educational qualifications.  The points system in its current form is set out in the table below:

CharacteristicsMandatory / TradeablePoints
Offer of job by an approved sponsorMandatory20
Job at an appropriate skill levelMandatory20
Speak English at the required levelMandatory10
Salary of £20,480 to £23,039 or at least 80% of the going rate for the profession (whichever is higher)Tradeable0
Salary of £23,040 to £25,599 or at least 90% of the going rate for the profession (whichever is higher)Tradeable10
Salary of £25,600 or above or at least the going rate for the profession (whichever is higher)Tradeable20
Job in a shortage occupation as designated by the Migration Advisory CommitteeTradeable20
Education qualification: PhD in a subject relevant to the jobTradeable10
Education qualification: PhD in a STEM subject relevant to the jobTradeable20

Using these criteria, applicants can “trade” characteristics such as their qualifications against a lower salary to get the required points total of 70. If the job offered has a salary less than the minimum salary requirement but not less than £20,480, the applicant may still be eligible if they have:

  • a job offer in an occupation which has been specifically listed as having a shortage of workers
  • a PhD qualification that is relevant to the job
  • a PhD in a STEM subject that is relevant to the job

What does the points-based immigration system mean for sponsors?

From 1st January 2021, UK employers that wish to recruit EU and non-EU citizens will need a sponsor licence. Under the new system, these will be known as “Skilled Worker Licences”, whilst licenses for intra-group transfers of employees within a wider international company group will be renamed “Intra-Company Transfer licences”.

When applying for a sponsor licence, checks will be implemented to ensure that the organisation is solvent, whilst key senior individuals within the sponsoring employer will be subject to a criminal record and potentially other security checks.

Employers will continue to be subject to charges of £1,000 per skilled worker (Immigration Skills Charge) for the first 12 months of their employment, with a further £500 charge for each subsequent period of six months. These charges will apply to the vast majority of sponsors, although discounts may be available for smaller employers and charities.

Aside from the scrutiny discussed above, the Government has committed to delivering “radical changes” to the sponsorship process. These changes are aimed at streamlining the sponsorship application process and reducing the amount of time it takes to bring in a new migrant worker.

Examples of changes due to be implemented include the suspension on the current cap on migrant numbers who can come to the UK and removing the requirement for employers to advertise roles in certain ways before hiring a migrant worker, known as the resident labour market test

Will there be routes for highly skilled and non-skilled workers?

In line with the new points-based system, the Government has expressed its intention to create an unsponsored route to attract the most highly skilled workers to the UK even if they do not yet have a job offer. This route will not commence on 1st January 2021, and further details are expected to be announced in due course.

As mentioned previously, further information has been provided on the route for Graduates. Students that complete an undergraduate or master’s degree can apply for a two-year Graduate visa to remain and work in the UK. PhD students will be eligible for a similar route, albeit for three years.

Regrettably, the new points-based system does not currently make provision for non-skilled workers. Whilst the tradeable points system is arguable more flexible than the current regime (reducing the minimum salary threshold from £30,000 to £20,480, for instance), it is unlikely that many of the roles for which employers currently recruit EU, and non-EU workers will qualify. The Government have, however, drawn attention to the youth mobility scheme, which currently sees 20,000 young people come to the UK from eight countries each year.

Getting ready for the new immigration system

As we get closer to the end of the Brexit transition period and the beginning of the new points-based system on 1st January 2021, there is much for employers to do if they wish to continue recruiting from overseas.

Companies that have an existing sponsor licence do not necessarily need to take action, but they should monitor announcements from the Government for any changes that may apply to them. This period also presents a good opportunity to update records and procedures to ensure that the sponsorship process works efficiently.

For one thing, the right to work checks are changing under the new system, and applicants will be able to use an online platform to demonstrate and verify their right to work. This means that employers will be permitted to conduct right to work checks remotely – including via video call.

For those companies that do not have a current sponsor licence, applications should be made sooner rather than later. Although the standard time for processing a sponsor application is 8 weeks, the Home Office may take considerably longer than this as they rush to deal with the influx of new applications at the same time as combatting the effects of COVID-19. Whilst it is not necessary to apply for a sponsor licence when employing UK citizens or EU citizens registered under the EU Settlement Scheme, companies will require a sponsor licence to employ workers under any other circumstances.

At W H Solicitors we understand that the new points-based immigration scheme raises many questions and stand ready to support UK employers and migrants alike. As a specialist firm of immigration solicitors, we have an in-depth knowledge of the sponsorship process and can guide you past the pain points towards an effective employment outcome. From conducting right to work checks through to making detailed representations on behalf of our clients, we are experienced in all areas of UK immigration law. We are equipped to help clients of all sizes to hire high-quality personnel from overseas.

To secure continuity for yourself or your business, contact our expert team today on (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk. Whether you are an individual or a large corporation, we will listen to your concerns, work with you to achieve your goals, and find the solution to any immigration problems you face

Points-Based Immigration System: What It Means For UK Employers And Migrants From 1st January 2021, the UK will be subject to a new points-based immigration system. Marking the effective end of free movement with the EU. The

The United Kingdom formally left the European Union at 2300 GMT on 31st January 2020, with a transition period lasting until 2300 GMT on 31st December 2020. As this period draws closer to its end, so too does the UK’s involvement in the EU’s freedom of movement. This change will affect migration into the UK.

Brexit has had a significant effect on immigration law and continues to make waves amongst both migrant communities and Brits who live abroad. For one thing, British nationals living abroad in the EU, EEA or Switzerland are currently entitled to bring their family members to the UK in an immigration route that was largely established by the groundbreaking Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) Judgment in the 1992 case of Surinder Singh.

In this article, we focus on what Brexit means for British citizens living in the EU who hope to return to the UK with their family members.

What is the Surinder Singh route?

In a nutshell, the Surinder Singh case allows a British citizen living in another EEA country with their non-EEA national spouse or dependants to return to the UK with their family members – who have effectively gained free movement immigration rights under European law.

Surinder Singh was an Indian citizen who lived with his wife – a British citizen – in Germany. When the couple returned to the UK, Mr Singh was allowed to reside with his wife under UK immigration laws which granted him limited leave to remain. When the couple divorced, the UK authorities acted to remove Mr Singh from the country on the basis that he no longer had leave to remain – a decision that he challenged in the UK courts which duly referred the case to the  Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU).

Handing down its decision in case C-370/90, the CJEU rules that Mr Singh had a right to reside in the UK as his wife had previously exercised her own right to free movement by working in Germany. The Court held that a European Citizen would be discouraged from working elsewhere in the EU if they could not bring their family with them when returning to their country of origin. The Court ruled that an EU citizen who exercises their treaty rights by going to work in another Member State has the right to return with their non-EEA spouse, children and other dependants, regardless of their nationality.

When we look closer at the Surinder Singh route, it effectively means that a partner or family member of a British citizen who lived with them in an EU Member State or Switzerland can apply for settled status (with indefinite leave to enter or remain in the UK) or pre-settled status (with limited leave to enter or remain in the UK) under the EU Settlement Scheme.

What’s changing?

As EU law will cease to be applicable in the UK at 2300 GMT on 31st December 2020, the UK has incorporated the essence of the Surinder Singh route within the UK immigration rules under Appendix EU. This means that a non-EU family member of a British national can apply for settled status (indefinite leave to enter or remain in the UK) or for pre-settled status (limited leave to enter or remain in the UK) under the EU Settlement Scheme.

With the UK’s participation in the freedom of movement ending on the 31st December 2020, the rights of British nationals to bring their non-British family members back to the UK are now time-sensitive. The family members of British nationals who wish to return to the UK can now rely on two major routes:

  • Using a valid Article 10 or Article 20 residence card to travel to the UK as the non-EEA national family member of an EEA citizen, or as an EEA citizen family member exercising free movement rights in an EEA state of which they are not national.
  • Applying for an EEA Family permit or EU Settlement Scheme family permit

Applying with an Article 10 or Article 20 card

Article 10 and Article 20 residence cards are documents issued under the EU Free Movement Directive by EEA Member States to the non-EEA family members of EU citizens. The holder of a valid Article 10 or Article 20 residence card can travel to the UK without the need to obtain an EEA or EUSS family permit – provided that they can evidence the fact that they are the family member of an EEA citizen (for instance, by showing a birth or marriage certificate). Once in the UK, an Article 10 or 20 card holder can then apply under the EU settlement scheme.

Article 10 residence cards or “Residence Cards of a Family Member of a Union Citizen” are available are issued to the non-EEA family members of EU citizens living and working in another EEA country. Article 20 residence cards, or “Permanent Residence Cards of a Family Member of a Union Citizen” are issued on the same basis.

It is worth keeping in mind that documents issued on any other basis will not provide the same rights and protections as Article 10 and 20 residence cards. Residence permits under domestic law (and not under EU law) will not exempt immigrants to the UK from the need to apply for a EEA family permit or EUSS family permit. Domestic residence permits are usually issued to the non-EEA family members of EU citizens who are living in their country of origin (e.g. the non-EEA spouse of a French citizen living in France will usually be issued a domestic permit).

If your family member does not have an Article 10 or Article 20 card, you may wish to consider applying for a family permit (granted for a period of six months) before applying from within the UK for 5 years’ of status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

Applying for an Family Permit or Family Visa under UK Immigration Law

British citizens living and working in the EU  do not have to meet the strict criteria of UK domestic immigration laws to bring their partner or family member to the UK.

These requirements include meeting the financial requirement – which entails having a minimum income of £18,600 per year before tax, with an additional £3,800 for one child and £2,400 each for any additional children. Under domestic rules, the British citizen’s applicant partner will also generally be required to pass an English language test and other criteria.

It is therefore not only easier to meet the criteria for a Family Permit application than for a UK Family visa, but cheaper (as a UK Family visa application costs at least £1,033 and paying an Immigration Health Surcharge fee of over £1000). A Family Permit application is free. This route allows the spouse, civil partner, child, stepchild, parent, or parent-in-law of a British Citizen to enter and reside in the UK provided that they have exercised Treaty Rights in another EU state, and does not involve the same expensive application or extension fees of its UK law counterpart.

With Britain’s involvement in EU free movement coming to an end on 31st December 2020, time is running out for applications made under the Family Permit route. After the Brexit transition period ends, all applications will fall under UK immigration law. So it will be necessary for applicants to meet criteria such as the minimum financial requirement and English language testing.

What are the criteria for a Surinder Singh application?

To qualify for an application under the Surinder Singh route, it is necessary for a British citizen to prove that their main residence was in another EU member state for at least three months and that they and their family member had lived and integrated there together.

The British citizen must also have exercised their treaty rights in the EU member state. In order to exercise your treaty rights, you must work, be self-employed, self-sufficient, or a student.

To qualify for an family permit, you must be the partner or family member of a British citizen who meets the criteria outlined above. Eligible family members include:

  • Spouses and civil partners
  • Children and grandchildren (either under the age of 21 or dependant on their British family member)
  • Parents and grandparents (where they are dependent on their British family member)

When do you need to apply by

To make an application for Family Permit before the rules change, British citizens and their family members will need to seriously consider the dates by which they must apply. The rules are based on Brexit day – the date upon which the UK formally left the EU. This fell on Friday 31st January 2020, and the following restrictions apply:

  • British nationals who formed a relationship with their family member (spouse, durable partner, child, dependent parent) before 31st January 2020 must return to the UK before 29th March 2022.
  • British nationals who started their relationship their family member (spouse, durable partner, child, dependant parent) after 31st January 2020 must have returned to the UK and apply before 31st December 2020.
  • British nationals who wish to bring extended family members or dependant (a relative of your spouse/civil/durable partner) back to the UK must do so by 31st December 2020, and the relationship must have existed prior to returning.

Applications for an EEA family permit can be completed online and must be made from outside of the UK. For non-British nationals who wish to enter the UK at the same time as their British partner or family member, the eligibility criteria must be met in the EEA country where you are currently living, whilst those who want to join a British family member in the UK must prove that they met the criteria together in an EEA country.

Upon application, you must provide the following documents:

  • a valid passport
  • 2 passport size colour photographs
  • evidence of your relationship to your British family member, such as a marriage certificate, civil partnership certificate or birth certificate
  • your family member’s valid passport (or a certified copy if you cannot provide the original)
  • a list showing when you’ve been in the UK – include the dates you arrived and left
  • a list of any other UK visa or immigration applications you’ve made – include whether you applied from inside or outside the UK, and details of each visa or permission to stay if you were successful
  • a list showing any removals, deportations, or other immigration penalties you’ve had in the UK.

In addition, the applicant and their British partner must provide evidence showing that they genuinely made their home in another EEA country, with proof that:

  • you lived there together – including any addresses, time spent living at each address and proof of buying or renting a home; and
  • you integrated there – for instance speaking the language, having children born or living there, or involvement in the local community.

It is also necessary to show that your British family member:

  • was working, in self-employment, self-sufficient, or studying in the EEA country where you lived together; or
  • if they returned to the UK more than 3 months before the date of your application, that they are working, looking for work, self-employed, self-sufficient, or studying in the UK.

Expert guidance to secure your family’s status

Brexit has brought about a wealth of changes to the way that UK immigration law works, and time is running out for British citizens who wish to return to the country with their partner or family member without having to satisfy the onerous criteria of a UK family visa application.

As the Brexit transition period draws closer to its end, Brits returning to the UK from EEA countries will need to make certain that any application made under the Surinder Singh route is completed effectively and at the right time.

As a specialist immigration law practice, the expert team at W H Solicitors have an intimate understanding of the rules surrounding family immigration into the UK. With extensive experience of making successful applications on behalf of our clients, you can be sure that your case will be dealt with in a sensitive yet professional manner.

Whether you need guidance on the criteria for an EEA Family Permit, or want to ensure that your application effectively proves that you made your life in an EEA country, we can help.

To secure a smooth return to the UK for you and your family, contact our experts today on (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk. We will listen to your concerns, work with you to achieve your goals, and find the solution to any immigration problems you face.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

The United Kingdom formally left the European Union at 2300 GMT on 31st January 2020, with a transition period lasting until 2300 GMT on 31st December 2020. As this period draws closer to its end, so too

As part of their purported commitment to the NHS, the British government has announced a new visa scheme tailored specifically for the health and care industry. With applications having opened from 4 August 2020 there is still much confusion around the eligibility requirements for the Health and Care visa, not least because it does not provide a route of entry for care home workers.

Despite any potential shortcomings, the Health and Care Visa is set to provide foreign “qualified doctors, nurses and allied health professionals” with a quicker and cheaper route of entry into the UK than currently exists under the Tier 2 visa policy guidance.

In this article, we look at the key facts behind the Health and Care visa, its eligibility requirements, and how the Immigration Health Surcharge exemption will work in practice.

What is the UK government offering?

In what the UK Home Office has described as a “fast-track” visa route for eligible health and care professionals, a new sub-category of visa has been designed to help talented health professionals to come to the UK to work in the NHS and for other approved healthcare providers.

The Health and Care Visa will come at a reduced cost than is usually applicable for visa applications made by skilled workers,  with a visa for up to 3 years costing £232 and a visa for more than 3 years costing £464 (with further reduced rates for citizens of Turkey and Macedonia). In addition, decisions can be expected within three weeks of an applicant having completed biometric enrolment (which involves having a digital photo, fingerprint scans and a copy of your signature taken).

Successful applicants will be able to come to the UK with a Tier 2 (Health and Care) visa for a maximum of 5 years and 14 days, however, applications should be made no earlier than 3 months before qualifying work is due to start in the UK.

To launch the Health and Care Visa, the government have introduced a special exemption from the Immigration Health Surcharge for applicants and their dependants. This fee (currently of £400 per year) is usually charged as part of a visa application and grants applicants the ability to use the National Health Service (NHS).

Who is eligible?

The new Health and Care Visa is available to “qualified doctors, nurses and allied health professionals who have been trained to a recognised standard” from outside of the European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland and who have been offered an eligible role either by an NHS trust, local health board or another approved medical or social care organisation.

Applicants must not own more than 10% of their sponsor’s shares (unless earning more than £159,600 per year, but may be permitted to study, do voluntary work and even undertake a second job if certain circumstances are met during their stay.

A full list of qualifying employers can be found at paragraph A2 of the government’s Tier 2 Policy Guidance, whilst the full list of eligible professions (and their occupational classification codes) is set out below:

  • 2112 – Biological scientists and biochemists
  • 2113 – Physical Scientists
  • 2211 – Medical Practitioners
  • 2212 – Psychologists
  • 2213 – Pharmacists
  • 2214 – Ophthalmic Opticians
  • 2215 – Dental practitioners
  • 2217 – Medical Radiographers
  • 2218 – Podiatrists
  • 2219 – Health Professionals not elsewhere classified
  • 2221 – Physiotherapists
  • 2222 – Occupational Therapists
  • 2223 – Speech and Language Therapists
  • 2229 – Therapy professionals not elsewhere classified
  • 2231 – Nurses
  • 2232 – Midwives
  • 2442 – Social Workers
  • 3213 – Paramedics

In addition to meeting the basic eligibility criteria, applicants for the Health and Care Visa will also need to meet the criteria for a Tier 2 (General) visa, namely:

  • having a valid Certificate of Sponsorship from a qualifying employer;
  • having evidence of a salary that meets the relevant salary threshold (set out in Appendix J to the Immigration Rules);
  • being able to meet the English language requirement (which we explained in a previous article);
  • having sufficient personal savings when arriving in the UK (typically an applicant must have £945 in their bank account for 90 days before making an application);
  • being able to demonstrate the ability to travel and provide a travel history for the previous five years;
  • holding a valid tuberculosis test certificate (for applicants from listed countries); and
  • providing a criminal record certificate from any country where the applicant has lived for 12 months or longer during the previous 10 years (if the applicant’s role in the UK will involve work with vulnerable people).

What about care home workers?

The list of eligible professions provided above is exhaustive, and so primary care workers including those who seek to come to the UK to work in a care home will generally not qualify for the Health and Care Visa.

Many migrant social care workers will therefore be unable to come to the UK by applying for a Health and Care Visa – a decision that has sparked criticism from advocates of the care system. The government’s move to exclude primary care workers from applying for the Health and Care Visa is potentially concerning given that many of these essential workers will not meet the necessary income threshold to successfully apply for another type of Visa.

Who is exempt from the Immigration Health Surcharge?

In addition to the Health and Care Visa, the UK government has announced a permanent exemption from the Immigration Health Surcharge for health and care staff. This exemption will apply to applicants for the Health and Care Visa along with their partners, spouses and dependants.

The government have also pledged to refund the Immigration Health Surcharge for any Tier 2 Visa applicants working in approved health and care roles, provided that they paid the fee on or after 31 March 2020. Health and care workers who do not qualify for the Health and Care Visa will also be reimbursed for payments made towards the Immigration Health Surcharge – although no arrangements have yet been made for these reimbursements to be made.

Expert legal support from W H Solicitors

With applications for the Health and Care Visa having opened from 4 August 2020, the UK could become a viable destination for many highly skilled health and social workers from overseas. Cheaper application fees, a quick turnaround time and free NHS healthcare without the need to pay a surcharge are all attractive features of the new visa scheme.

Despite the government’s eagerness to attract high-quality medical talent, applicants may be struck by how difficult it can be to navigate the UK’s complex immigration system.

At W H Solicitors our extensive knowledge of UK immigration law has helped us to guide scores of clients in making successful visa applications across all categories. We understand how stressful migrating to a new country can be, and our expert team strive to provide our clients with a smooth transition to life in the UK.

If you are a skilled health professional looking to come to the UK, contact our experts on (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

We will listen to your concerns, work towards your goals, and find the solution to your immigration problems.

As part of their purported commitment to the NHS, the British government has announced a new visa scheme tailored specifically for the health and care industry. With applications having opened from 4 August 2020 there is still

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British Citizenship For Hong Kong Residents – What You Need To Know

Note: This briefing note is a revision of the information published by WH Solicitors on 17 July 2020 to reflect updated guidance issued by the UK government on 22 July 2020.

The Chinese Government has approved a new national security law for Hong Kong, further tightening its grip on the city despite its special administrative region status. Drawing widespread condemnation from the international community, many Hong Kong residents are now understandably anxious about their future under increasingly severe authority controls.

Acting with concern for the former British colony, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has brought forward plans to offer an estimated three million Hong Kong residents the chance to settle in the UK and even apply for citizenship. With a formal statement presented to the UK parliament by Home Secretary Priti Patel on 22 July 2020, the groundwork has now been laid down to secure a new immigration route for British National (Overseas) citizens currently residing in Hong Kong.

As specialist immigration lawyers, the team at WH Solicitors have been closely monitoring the situation in Hong Kong and in this article, we explain some of the key information that HK residents need to know about the British Government’s settlement and citizenship offer before applications open in January 2021.

What’s happening in Hong Kong?

The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has tightened its control over the Hong Kong special administrative region with a new national security law. Enacted as the “Law of the People’s Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region”, it was passed at China’s annual National People’s Congress on 28 May 2020.

Amongst its more concerning features, the new security law provides for the establishment of a new Beijing-controlled security force and the criminalisation of many behaviours including any ‘collusion’ with foreign powers. Perhaps even more concerning, however, is the fact that any interpretation of the new law will fall to the Chinese Government.

In the spirit of what the Foreign Secretary described as a “historic commitment to the people of Hong Kong”, the UK government has labelled the move a “clear and serious breach” of the 1985 Sino-British joint declaration on the rights and freedoms of the city. As international leaders move to condemn these steps, Hong Kong citizens are faced with the dilemma of whether they should move away or continue to live in a place that is gradually looking less and less like home.

What is the UK offering to Hong Kong citizens?

With growing concern for the residents of the former British Dependent territory, the UK Home Office has acted to “significantly improve” the entitlements of those living in Hong Kong with British National (Overseas) – or “BNO” – status.

Under the plans set out by the UK government on 22 July 2020, Hong Kong-resident BNO citizens and their dependants will have the opportunity to enter the UK with a valid visa yet without the need to satisfy any skills tests, the minimum income requirement, the English language requirement or any of the other tests that are typically required to secure visa status.

Following an initial visa period of five years during which BNO status holders will have the right to work and study, it will then be possible to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR). If this is a granted, an application could be lodged for full British citizen just one year later. Whilst successful visa applicants will not be entitled to state financial support or recourse to public funds, they will be able to access healthcare on the NHS (subject to paying the Immigration Health surcharge) and free education for children under 18.

With no limits or quotas on the number of applicants to which visas can be granted, the Government has described the scheme as “special and bespoke”. At present, the Home Office plans to begin accepting BNO visa applications from January 2021.

What is BNO status?

British National (Overseas) – or BNO  – status was granted to Hong Kong residents that registered before control of the city was handed back to China in July 1997. BNO is a closed status, meaning that it is not possible to become one now if you are not already eligible. Both valid and invalid BNO passports are set to be accepted as proof of status by the UK Home Office. However, it may also be possible for applicants who do not have the relevant documentation to enter if the immigration authorities can find a record of their BNO registration.

Until now, BNO status has conferred a limited number of benefits including the chance to hold a British passport, seek consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts and visit the UK without a visa for up to 6 months at a time.

With an estimated 2.9 million BNOs in Hong Kong, this new route to settlement and citizenship stands to be one of the most extensive immigration schemes in UK history.

What are the requirements for the UK’s BNO visa scheme?

BN(O) citizens and their immediate family dependants who qualify for the UK’s BNO visa will be granted leave to remain in the UK for a period of five years. This period will consist of an initial 30 months’ leave, which can be renewed by a second charged application for an additional 30 months. It will also be possible to apply for the full five years within the first application. Dependants will need to demonstrate and evidence the nature of their relationship with the primary BNO applicant – for instance by providing a wedding or birth certificate.

Notably, the Government has set out that BNO visa applicants will not be required to satisfy any skills tests, the minimum income requirements, or English language requirements in order to qualify.

To be eligible for the scheme, BN(O) status holders and their dependants must:

  • Be ordinarily resident in Hong Kong;
  • Be able to demonstrate the ability to accommodate and support themselves in the UK for at least six months (through an offer of employment, substantial savings, investments, pension income, or support from family or friends);
  • Show a commitment to learn English where appropriate (although there will not be an English language requirement for BNO visa applicants and their dependants);
  • Hold a current tuberculosis (TB) test certificate from a Home Office approved clinic (more information about this can be found on the UK government website);
  • Pay the relevant visa fee, the fee for biometrics enrolment and the Immigration Health Surcharge (the details of which are set out later in this article); and
  • Have no serious criminal convictions and not be subject to any of the general grounds of refusal for entry to the UK set out in the Immigration Rules.

Can the dependants of BNO passport holders come to the UK?

The new visa scheme will apply to both persons with BNO status and their immediate family dependants – including their spouse, partner and any children under the age of 18. Dependants will need to ordinarily be resident in Hong Kong to qualify, but do not need to have BNO status themselves.

As is the case for persons with BNO status, dependants will be eligible to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) in the UK after the initial five year visa period and British citizenship a year after this (subject to meeting the requirements specific to these applications).

Despite the criteria listed above, the UK government has also recognised that there are situations in which dependants who are not under 18 or in the immediate family unit of a BNO status holder will wish to come to the UK. In such circumstances, the immigration officials will have the discretion to grant a visa to dependants of BNO applicants aged 18 and over in compelling and compassionate circumstances, provided that they were born after 1 July 1997.

Other exceptional circumstances will be considered for adult dependants of BNO citizens, and decisions will be made at the UK Government’s discretion on a case by case basis.

Why come to the UK?

For those Hong Kong residents considering moving away from the city, the UK remains a top destination with plenty of advantages waiting for migrants. For one thing, as Hong Kong is a former British Overseas Territory, there are cultural similarities that could help new arrivals to settle into life with ease. With nearly 50% of Hong Kong residents able to communicate in English, Great Britain could be a natural choice for those seeking a new start away from the security law turmoil at home.

Hong Kong residents who are particularly concerned about the reach of the new security law may also feel reassured by the UK’s proactive approach to separating its legal system from the power of political decision-makers. In addition to this, becoming a legal resident of the UK can be hugely beneficial with access to free healthcare through the National Health Service (NHS) and a leading education system with some of the most well-regarded schools and universities in the world.

With a renowned professional services sector and growing activity in the science, technology and production industries, migrants to the UK also stand to benefit from coveted job opportunities and the chance to build a career in a centrally located, vibrant global economy.

How to get a BNO visa

With the BNO visa due to launch in January 2021, the Government has announced that applications will be made via a digital online process by applicants in the UK, Hong Kong or elsewhere. In the meantime, Hong Kong residents with BNO status can travel to the UK for an initial period of six months under existing BNO passport rules.

The Government has not yet announced the fee which will be charged for BNO visa applications, but is expected to do so during Autumn 2020. Whilst further guidance is required on this point, any future citizenship applications will be subject to fees. At present, the cost of registering for settled status or as a British citizen is as follows:

  • £2,389 to register for settled status within the UK
  • £1,206 for those with BNO status registering as British citizens;
  • £1,330 for naturalisation; and
  • £1,012 for child registration of a BNO dependant.

In addition to this, all citizenship applications are subject to a £19.20 biometric enrolment fee. Visa status for BNO applicants and their dependants is also conditional on the payment of the Immigration Health Surcharge, which currently costs £400 per year for most visa categories – with five years of cover costing £2,000.

What about non-BNO citizens?

If you do not have BNO status and therefore will not qualify for the BNO visa, you may still be eligible for a visa in another category. These alternative routes are likely to be of interest to any non-BNO Hong Kong residents along with non-eligible dependants of BNO status holders.

In their recent briefing, the UK government has drawn attention to the Youth Mobility scheme which may be of interest to any non-eligible dependants of BNO status holders aged between 18-30. The scheme offers Tier 5 visa status to up to 1,000 applicants each year. In addition to the age requirements, applicants must hold a genuine desire to live and work in the UK for up to 2 years, have £1,890 in savings and ordinarily be resident in certain territories (of which Hong Kong is one).

For those non-eligible dependants of BNO passport holders, it may be possible to enter the country with a family visa, drawing on their connections to relatives already living in the UK. In addition, the UK already sees an established flow of Hong Kong residents applying for visas each year, with the following categories amongst the most popular:

  • Tier 2 sponsored work visa – where a UK employer is willing to sponsor their employee to come to the UK, subject to minimum skill and salary levels);
  • Tier 4 student visa – available for who are sponsored by a qualifying educational provider;
  • Tier 1 Investor visa – for those able to make a £2 million investment in the UK; or
  • Sole Representative of an Overseas Business visa – available for those who come to the UK with the authority and resources to set up a branch of an existing overseas business;
  • Start-up/Innovator Visa – available for those who want to set up a business in the UK, which is innovative, scalable and viable;
  • Global Talent Visa – available to talented and promising individuals in the relevant field wishing to come to the UK for work;
  • Asylum – if you feel that you will be persecuted if returned to Hong Kong, you may be able to seek asylum.

Can BNO citizens come to the UK before January 2021?

Although the UK’s BNO visa scheme is not set to begin until January 2021, it follows that some Hong Kong residents will be anxious to avoid the effects of the new security law and any unrest it may bring.

For those wishing to leave Hong Kong for the UK sooner than January 2021, it will be possible for Border Force Officers to consider granted Leave Outside the Rules (LOTR) for a period of six months on a case by case basis.

Exceptional decisions of this kind will only be available to BNO citizens and any accompanying dependants who do not satisfy Border Force that they are eligible for entry via another route. Entry to the UK is not guaranteed and individuals may be refused entry to the UK if Border Force Officers have a good reason to do so.

How we can help

The UK’s settlement and citizenship offer could be a lifeline for the many BNO status Hong Kong residents who are rightly concerned about the implications of the new Beijing-led security law. As further details emerge, however, it is important to recognise that the UK immigration system can be complex, and it is not always clear how best to approach the challenges that may arise when making a visa application.

At WH Solicitors, we pride ourselves on the calm and considered care that we give to our clients. With years of experience covering every area of UK immigration law, our expert team are equipped to provide you with the guidance needed to secure the right status for you and your family. Backed by an extensive knowledge of the UK immigration system, we could help you to successfully apply for a BNO visa and otherwise are well equipped to make strong representations for non-BNO dependants and others who do not qualify for this new route of entry into the UK.

No matter what situation you face, we stand ready to provide you with clarity and peace and peace of mind.

For a discreet, no obligations discussion, contact our experts on (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing contact@whsolicitors.co.uk . We will listen to your concerns and find the solution to your immigration problems.

We will listen to your concerns and find the solution to your immigration problems.

Flickr British Citizenship For Hong Kong Residents – What You Need To Know Note: This briefing note is a revision of the information published by WH Solicitors on 17 July 2020 to reflect updated guidance issued by

Image by Dean Moriarty from Pixabay

The Coronavirus pandemic has affected much of our way of life in the UK, as it has across the world. For those involved in the immigration process, these are extraordinarily trying times whether you are making an initial application to enter the UK (the entry clearance stage), seeking to extend your visa, or requesting Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR).

If you have been affected, and want to know the best way to move forward and secure your visa, contact us on +441483608786 or email us on contact@whsolicitors.co.uk.

Although the health implications of Covid-19 are undoubtedly significant, the financial consequences of the virus and lockdown cannot be ignored. A considerable number of people have seen unprecedented changes to their working patterns and in some cases have lost their regular income entirely. A loss of income is always a serious matter. Still, for migrants applying for a spouse or partner visa, it could create major issues given that they must meet what is known as the ‘minimum income requirement’.

In this article, we examine what the minimum income requirement is, whether there is any flexibility during the Coronavirus pandemic, and what you can do to prevent your application from failing to meet the criteria.

What is the financial requirement?

The financial requirement for a UK spouse or unmarried partner visa is found at Appendix FM of the Immigration Rules. It sets out six ways in which the minimum income requirement can be met.

To sponsor a partner under the UK immigration rules, sponsors (and applicants in extension and Indefinite Leave to Remain applications) must demonstrate that they earn a minimum of £18,600 per year, have held at least £62,500 in savings for six months or longer (if relying on savings alone), or show that they meet the required standard of income through a combination of different streams that could include both savings and regular income.

As mentioned above, there are several different kinds of qualifying income that can count towards the minimum income requirement, namely:

  • Income generated from the salary of an employed partner or applicant (income usually paid at a minimum fixed rate that may be subject to a minimum number of hours worked within a set period);
  • Income from the non-salaried employment of the partner or applicant (income usually paid at an hourly rate or at an amount dependant on the work undertaken);
  • Income from self-employment, or from a role as a director or employee of a specified limited UK company;
  • Any non-employment income generated by the partner or applicant;
  • Cash savings of the partner or applicant over £16,000 that must have been held for at least six months at the point of application; or
  • Income from a State (UK or foreign), occupational or private pension of either the partner or applicant.

Income generated from the employment of the applicant will only count if they have the relevant permission to work in the UK, and it is possible to meet the requirement via certain combinations of the above qualifying categories.

It is also important to note that the minimum income requirement is different for those applicants who have children. Alongside the minimum £18,600 annual income requirements for the applicant alone, a further £3,800 is required for a first child, with an extra £2,400 for any additional children. In most cases, an applicant with two children will, therefore, be required to demonstrate that they have an annual income of at least £24,800.

Why is there a financial requirement?

Challenges to the minimum income requirement have already been played out before the courts, and there is an extensive commentary both from legal professionals and the Home Office discussing the legality and reasoning of this requirement.

The official reason for the minimum income requirement is perhaps most clearly discussed in the judgment of the Supreme Court in R (on the application of MM (Lebanon) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2017] UKSC 10.

In this case, the Court recognised that the intentions of the Home Office and Secretary of State had been to ensure that migrants who apply for entry and leave to remain in the UK via the spouse or partner route have sufficient resources to play a full part in British life without the need to rely on benefits and state support, but also take into consideration any impact it will have to any children involved.

How can you meet the financial requirement?

At face value, the minimum financial requirement and the accepted ways of meeting it seem fairly obvious. What is more complex, however, is the approach taken by immigration officials when working out whether an applicant has reached the required annual income standard. The way your income will be assessed depends on how it was generated (via one or a combination of the six qualifying income types listed above):

  • Applicants who have been employed by the same employer for at least six months on a salaried basis will be examined based on the lowest level of annual salary received in the six month period relied upon;
  • Applicants who have been employed by the same employer for at least six months on a non-salaried basis are examined on the “total gross income from employment held throughout the 6 month period, divided by six, and multiplied by 12”; 
  • Applicants who have been employed on a salaried basis for less than six months are examined on their gross annual salary at the date of their application; 
  • Applicants who have been employed on a non-salaried basis for less than six months are examined based on their total gross income from non-salaried employment in the period prior to application, divided by the number of months they have been employed, and multiplied by 12.

It is also worth noting that, regardless of the income relied upon, the applicant or their partner must show that their income would have satisfied the minimum income and providing the specified documents to support the application.

The minimum financial requirement during Coronavirus

With the coronavirus pandemic casting a huge shadow on people’s earning potentials, it is clear that there is scope for this public health emergency to have a knock-on effect on applications for spouse and partner visas. With businesses prevented from trading and entire industries struggling to remain open, many people face the very real risk of being made redundant, or otherwise being unable to earn if they are self-employed or on a zero-hour contract.

Whilst there is a range of government support packages available to those who are unable to earn at the rate they were before the lockdown, or even at all, whether these will allow an applicant to reach the minimum financial threshold is highly dependent on the individual circumstances of those involved.

The UK Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is one such support package that enables employees to continue earning despite being temporarily released from their role, and these earnings could, therefore, be used to demonstrate an income which meets the minimum standard for a UK spouse or partner visa. The scheme allows employers to furlough their staff and apply for a Government grant to cover 80% of their usual monthly wage costs, up to £2,500 per employee per month. In cases where a partner or visa applicant has been furloughed, it seems likely that the Home Office would accept that there has not been a break in their employment – although the Government has not yet issued any clear advice on this point.

In addition, those furloughed employees receiving only 80% of their usual salary may be concerned that they do not currently earn the minimum amount to satisfy the financial requirement even though they would do so when earning their full wage. This is particularly concerning as payments from state benefits such as Universal Credit do not qualify for consideration under the Immigration Rules for the minimum financial requirement.

How to meet the minimum financial requirement during Coronavirus

Even despite the current situation, it is above all vital that any application for a visa extension or indefinite leave to remain is made in time. Failing to do could lead to you becoming an overstayer in the UK, which could leave you at the mercy of the UK’s hostile environment and subject to being removed from the country. This is an issue that is best-tackled head-on, without waiting for an easing of the Coronavirus and the measures introduced to combat it.

If you find that you are unable to meet the minimum financial requirement through a regular source of income from employment, there are options available to you, and you should not dismiss your chances of qualifying for visa status without exploring whether you may be able to reach the threshold in another way. This could include meeting the minimum financial requirement by using a combination of incomes to demonstrate that you meet the criteria, or by arguing that exceptional circumstances apply meaning that your application should not be rejected despite failing to demonstrate earnings at the minimum required level.

UPDATE: 31st December 2020- The Home Office is now providing concessions to those who are unable to meet the financial requirement due to Covid-19 pandemic. The concession is set out below:

Coronavirus (COVID-19) concession

Instruction for handling cases which raise the impact of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic as grounds for not meeting the minimum income requirement in an entry clearance, leave to remain or indefinite leave to remain applications under the family Immigration Rules.

This guidance sets out the approach you must take over defined periods, when deciding a case, to ensure applicants are not disadvantaged as a result of circumstances beyond their control because of COVID-19.

Income received via the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme or the Coronavirus Self-Employment Income Support Scheme can count as employment or self-employment income. Where there is evidence of a temporary loss of income due to COVID-19 during the period 1 March 2020 and 1 January 2021 you will apply the following concessions:

• a temporary loss of employment income between 1 March and 1 January 2021 due to COVID-19, will be disregarded provided the minimum income requirement was met for at least 6 months immediately prior to the date the income was lost – this is for a loss of employment income between 1 March 2020 to 1 January 2021 due to COVID-19 an applicant or sponsor furloughed under the Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will be deemed as earning 100% of their salary

• a temporary loss of annual income due to COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 1 January 2021 will generally be disregarded for self-employment income, along with the impact on employment income from the same period for future applications.

• evidential flexibility may be applied where an applicant or sponsor experiences
difficulty accessing specified evidence due to COVID-19 restrictions

Reach the minimum financial requirement via combinations of income

One route to reaching the minimum financial requirement is by relying on a combination of different types of income. Only certain combinations are permitted, but it is generally possible to rely on a combination of savings, pension income, property income and certain varieties of income from employment.

To rely on savings alone to meet the minimum financial requirement, the applicant would need to hold savings of £62,500. This is a considerable sum of money and raising it could prove difficult, but for applicants who seek to combine savings with another source of income will only need to have £16,000 plus 2.5 times the difference between their income and the minimum financial requirement figure. Any savings relied upon must have been held by the applicant for at least six months prior to the application being made and cannot have been borrowed.

The rules regarding income from pensions are somewhat more relaxed, and gross annual income from a state, occupational or private pension can be relied upon provided that it has been a source of income for at least 28 days before the application is made. Applicants relying on income from a pension should be aware that they will likely need to wait for six months if they are combining pension income with another source of income (savings, for example) to meet the minimum financial requirement.

Income generated from renting out a property can also be used to satisfy the minimum financial requirement in Appendix FM of the Immigration Rules, although the money raised from renting out part of your own home is not eligible. Income from property rental can be combined with both savings and pension income, and so can provide a clear route to reaching the minimum financial requirement for visa applicants with existing property investments in the UK. Similarly, dividends or other forms of income from investments are also recognised as qualifying income for the purposes of the minimum financial requirement and can be combined in much the same way as income from property rentals.

As is clear from the above, there are many routes towards satisfying the minimum financial requirement and provided that spouse and partner visa applicants follow the guidelines (which state, for instance, that certain types of income from employment cannot be combined with cash savings), they may find it possible to meet the criteria through a combination of various income types.

Exceptional Circumstances

For those applicants who would previously have met the minimum financial requirements, but have been left unable do so following the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, it may be possible to show evidence of ‘exceptional circumstances’ which would mean that refusing the application would lead to “unjustifiably harsh consequences” for the applicant and their family. Applicants should be aware that where exceptional circumstances are relied upon, leave to remain would be granted on a ten-year route to settlement rather than the usual five-year route.

If an exceptional circumstances argument can successfully be made, the Home Office will then consider other sources of income that do not fit within the specified list contained within Appendix FM of the Immigration Rules, which could include:

  • a genuine and verifiable guarantee of ongoing financial support to the applicant or their partner from a third party;
  • genuine and credible prospective future earnings from the employment or self-employment of the applicant or their partner;
  • any other credible and reliable source of income or funds for the applicant or their partner, which are available to them either at the date of application or which will become available to them during the period of leave to remain they have applied for.

Whilst arguments relating to other income on exceptional circumstances grounds may provide a flexible approach to meeting the minimum financial requirements, it is important to note that “unjustifiably harsh consequences” for the family must be demonstrated for this to succeed.

An alternative way forward may also be possible for those applicants who can demonstrate a ‘genuine and subsisting parental relationship’ with a child who is under 18 and has lived in the UK for a continuous period of at least seven years before the application date (or where the child is a British national). In such cases, the Home Office must take the child’s best interests into account when making an immigration decision. Similarly, where an applicant can demonstrate a genuine and ongoing relationship with a partner who is in the UK and is British, settled, with refugee status, or with humanitarian protection, the Home Office must take this into account if it can be shown attempting to continue ordinary family life outside of the UK would result in serious hardship.

Expert Support from WH Solicitors

There is no doubt that meeting the minimum financial requirement within an application for leave to remain in the UK is no simple task.

In such a complex area of immigration law, expert legal advice is often needed to ensure that you and your loved ones have the very best chance of seeing an application for leave to remain be approved.

The expert team at WH Solicitors have extensive experience of dealing with the Home Office and stand ready to provide you with clarity and peace of mind. Perhaps you have lost your job, been furloughed or are simply worried about the impact of the Coronavirus on your visa or immigration status. These are difficult challenges to face, but there is help available.

If you face any of these issues, contact our experts on (+44) 01483 608 786 or by emailing waleed@whsolicitors.co.uk. We will listen to your side of the story, and help find solutions to your immigration problems no matter how big or small.

The contents of this webpage are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal advice. All information is correct as of the date of publication, and any individual or organisation should be careful to seek qualified advice from a specialist immigration lawyer before acting on any of the topics referenced by this content.

Image by Dean Moriarty from Pixabay The Coronavirus pandemic has affected much of our way of life in the UK, as it has across the world. For those involved in the immigration process, these are extraordinarily trying times whether you